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The ABCs of online marketing

Pay attention, class.

Below you will find the ABCs of online marketing. Each letter not only represents an important characteristic of successful Web marketing, but also contains hyperlinks to associated articles that might be helpful for your future efforts.

OK, are you ready? Let’s review our ABCs:

Authenticity: In case you’ve missed our recurring theme, Spin Sucks. Authenticity is key for successful Web marketing.

Branding: Make sure yours is consistent across all your digital channels.

Content: High-quality content leads the way. Refine your skills as a content creator, and encourage a culture that recognizes its importance.

Details: They matter. In everything you do, whether it’s your content, social, SEO, media outreach, or crisis communication plan. Take the time to pay attention to the little things—they have a huge effect on your brand.

Education: This field changes constantly. Therefore, must learn continuously so you can keep up.

Focus: We have a zillion and three distractions coming at us every minute. This is especially true when dealing with Web marketing. To be successful you must learn to focus, to prioritize, and to recognize when to take a break.

Grow: To expand a business is hard. It often requires not only the right digital strategy but also an associated strategy to get the financial resources you need.

Humor: Those who laugh with you buy from you, according to an increasing number of studies. Learn to use humor strategically to boost your Web marketing strategies.

Integrity: Integrity and reputation are the most important assets that you and your organization have. Guard them fiercely, and choose to work with others who do the same.

Journalism: Brand journalism is an exciting new area when it comes to digital marketing. It can take many forms, but it offers a big return on investment if executed correctly.

Klout: OK, we all know your Klout score isn’t the be-all and end-all, but what it stands for, influence, is an important part of Web marketing. Influence and thought leadership (not the buzzword version, but real thought leadership) in your industry are important components of a successful digital strategy.

Limits: Know yours. You don’t have to be everywhere at once. Figure out what channels make the most sense for your brand and for where your target customer is.

Mobile: Consumers are using mobile devices more and more both to interact with your brand and to make purchasing decisions. Do you have a plan to take advantage of this important communication channel?

Navigate: Navigate the business seas informed, but fearless. Have a plan, but don’t be blinded by it. Be aware of change, and recognize when you should change course.

Own: Why rent when you could own? Build a strong owned media presence, both in the content you develop and the community you build.

Paid: With social media platforms (we’re looking at you, Facebook) increasingly working to find ways to monetize, you can no longer ignore looking at how paid media fits into your strategy.

Questions: Engage your community with questions. Ask them what they think, what they like, how they feel. They want to tell you. Listening will strengthen your business and their trust that you are truly interested in their needs.

ROI: Sure, you might have 10,000 Twitter followers, but that isn’t necessarily going to translate into a strong return on investment relative to your business goals. Create a digital strategy that provides a ROI.

Strategy: You must have a well-researched, targeted, and actionable strategy to be successful. This reaches across all parts of Web marketing, whether community building, media relations, or content development.

Time management: Time management skills are crucial. Cultivate practices that help your productivity.

United: Effective communication is about how to unite all the divisions of your organization to work together. No more silos.

Video: Making video part of your strategy continues to rise in importance. It’s not just about going viral; video helps tell your story in a personal way to help your customers connect with you in a manner that no other digital channel provides.

Winning: That’s what you are doing as part of this community. Go, you!

X: The artist formerly known as integration. Imagine the four media types represented by the tips of the X. Build a successful strategy to bring them together. After all, every pirate knows X marks the spot.

You: You are an important part of your brand. Let your personality show, as well as that of the rest of your team. People want to connect with people, not with nameless, faceless brands.

Zebra: Who wonders what a zebra would tweet? I know I do.

Source:prdaily.com

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Survey: By Slim Margin, More PR Pros Use Facebook Than Twitter for Brand Communications

social-media-apps-300x199

Sharing content across a variety of social media platforms is a part of life for PR professionals. But not all platforms were created equal. Despite their popularity with users, certain platforms are harder for professional communicators to use for business purposes.

With that in mind, PR News and Cision fielded the “State of Social Media for PR Pros” survey to take the pulse of the PR community and find out which social media platforms it’s using most, how it’s measuring success on those platforms and which sources of information it trusts most.

By a slim margin, PR pros who took the survey use Facebook more than Twitter on behalf of their brands or clients (87.6% vs. 85.1%). After Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube, there is a big drop-off in usage of the other social media platforms and apps.

social-media-usage-chart1

Source :prnewsonline.com

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6 tips for bite-sized technical content

alice-in-wonderland-bite

“Snackable” content is a hot topic in business-to-business marketing. According to this recent post on B2B Marketing, the average human attention span is now shorter than that of your typical goldfish. 

In a professional context, we are frequently short on time and under pressure to juggle conflicting priorities and meet tight deadlines. There are countless statistics to show that easy-to-digest, short-form (and preferably visual) content wins.

Whether it is a white paper, infographic, or case study, marketers are often briefed to create compelling content. The information that we are asked to communicate is usually highly technical. It can seem like an impossible task to create bite-size material without oversimplifying the story or omitting essential details. 

So, do the principles of “snackable” content still apply when looking to communicate highly complicated messages to technically demanding industrial B2B audiences? 

The first question, of course, is what are the “ideal” length and type of content to use in their marketing activity? Well, the answer varies depending on the nature of the material, but you can’t get away from this simple truth: the shorter, the better. 

We don’t kid ourselves. Snackable content does require a shift in mindset for some technically minded individuals. Lead generation can throw an additional consideration into the mix. 

If they have been asked to provide their contact information, isn’t there a risk that the reader will feel short-changed? But the strength of the content isn’t measured by the word count. It’s the value of what you are sharing that matters; your customer or prospect doesn’t want to have to trawl through pages of dense copy to uncover key takeaways.

Producing material on a complicated subject matter is usually easier said than done. Too often, the writer’s eyes are too big for the readers’ stomachs. The reasons for producing snackable content go out the window, despite the best intentions. 

How can you create content that appeals, while including all the requisite technical information?

1. Back to basics. Ask yourself three simple questions: Whom are you looking to talk to, what are their pressure points, and how are you going to help them? If you’re not sure, keep thinking or get input from somebody else.

2. Be clear. Identify your key message and make it clear that this is the purpose of the content. If you can’t summarise what you want the audience to learn from the material, then your reader won’t know either.

3. Keep firm. Don’t succumb to pressure, whatever the source, to broaden the content’s scope or include unnecessary details. It will only dilute the impact of the communication.

4. Don’t try a one-size-fits-all approach. Think about creating multiple pieces of content for different audiences and stages in the buying process. If there is too much to say, then try a series of technical papers. You don’t have to give the reader all the information in one go.

5. Think of your reader. When creating content, remember that we are all people. We process information in different ways, whether we prefer visuals, audio, or hard facts and figures. If your budget allows, consider multiple tools to deliver maximum appeal to your potential audience. 

6. Evaluate the results. Always measure the success of a campaign and accept that you might not always get it right the first time. Try alternative approaches, and use the analytics to hone your approach until you nail it.

The most important thing is to enjoy the intellectual challenge. It is not always going to be easy to create “tasty” technical content, but if you think carefully about what you want to achieve, then your content is likely to work harder for you in return. 

Source:prdaily.com

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How to rework your pitch for a guest contribution

pitching-frames

It’s a tale as old as time—OK, maybe as old as the last five years: You have a piece of contributed content that you spent days pulling together with your client.

You’ve pitched and pitched, and it seems like no one is interested in your byline on “Why ABC is the Future of XYZ.” Inspired by my colleague, Elizabeth Yekhtikian’s list of “10 Ways to Get Out of a Pitching Rut,” here are the questions to ask yourself when your contributed content is falling flat:

1. Is this too self- serving? We spend so much time living and breathing our client’s messaging that it can be easy to become blind to content that is overly self-promotional. When your pitch isn’t being well-received, it’s time to go back to the content with an editorial eye.

Ask yourself how you can reframe it to be less about the client and more about the problem or issue they’re addressing. Is there a larger trend you can tie the content to? Are there other examples you can use to illustrate the problem that don’t point back to your client?

The most common reason content is rejected is because it’s overly self-promotional, so when your content isn’t working this should be the first angle you take in reworking it.

2. Is this boring? You and your client might get all excited about mobile collaboration, but that doesn’t mean everyone else will. Take some time to figure out how you can make your content more exciting. The “listicle” is Buzzfeed’s bread-and-butter for good reason—it’s a format that works well for reading and sharing on the Web.

Can you shape your content to work as a list or a how-to? At the same time, take time to read through your major target’s headlines and top stories. How can you edit your content to match their style and tone? Finally, ask how you can make the content stand out. Is there a news angle you can add? Is there a contrarian stance you can argue? If your content reads like corporate boilerplate, it’s not going far.

3. What can we add? Charts, pictures, multimedia: The days of straightforward op-eds are long gone. How can you make your content more compelling? Is there a chart or image you can you use to illustrate your point of view? Why not embed a supporting video or get really wild and embed some tweets that illustrate your argument?

An editor will want visual elements when it’s time to publish the post, so get ahead of them by crafting your content around something visually compelling.

4. Is this the right pitch? When content isn’t working, it may be time to rethink how you’re pitching it. Some editors like getting the full draft of the content as part of the initial pitch, which removes some of the back-and-forth, though sometimes this can kill your content before it even has a chance.

Consider approaching your targets with less “Here’s this great piece of content with a unique POV and it’s all wrapped and ready to go,” and more “Hi, would you be interested in a byline from really interesting person A about XYZ? If not, how about 123?”

Some of my most successful content pitches have come from offering the editor a selection of byline angles that they can pick and choose from. This way, instead of trying to force-feed them, you’re establishing a mutually beneficial relationship.

Placing contributed content can make or break your PR program. When there’s no news, it’s often our best bet for keeping the coverage flowing. So, as you craft your content, ask yourself these questions before you put pen to paper. Your content (and client) will thank you for it.

Source:prdaily.com

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Study: Saying your brand is ‘the best’ isn’t the best marketing strategy

emma-stone_this-is-the-best

Is the product that you represent the absolute best in its category? If so, you may want to keep that news to yourself. 

A new study from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management shows that if you call your product “the best” it actually decreases its chance for success—something they’re calling the “maximizing mindset.” 

“If you’re in this maximizing mindset, no matter how good the product is, [consumers are] going to be unsatisfied with it if it’s anything less than the most amazing thing ever,” Neal J. Roese, a professor of marketing at the Kellogg School of Management and co-author of the study told BusinessNewsDaily. “It’s a hidden danger that marketers need to be aware of.” 

The study points to Red Bull, which never compares itself to competitors or claims that it’s the best. “By sidestepping such superlatives,” Fox Business writes, “the researchers found, Red Bull pushes consumers outside of the maximizing mindset and decreases dissatisfaction with the product.” 

In the study, the maximizing mindset caused consumers to feel regret or disappointment if the product didn’t live up to their expectations. 

Source:prdaily.com

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