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4 types of competitors that brands must battle

macho-arm-wrestling

I can’t begin to tell you how many times I’ve talked to executives who say they don’t have any competition. They talk about their unique selling proposition, their software innovation, or the new industry their business has created. 

When I hear this, the first thing I think comes from the public relations person in me: “There is no way I can put this person in front of a reporter to talk about the business, the industry, or anything.” The second thing is from the consumer in me: “This person is clearly not listening.” 

All companies have competitors. Recognizing this should be the second step in any marketing, PR, or social media strategy. (The first is identifying the audience.) There is not a single company, service, or product in the world that is the only choice a customer has, even if the alternative is doing nothing. 

There are four competitor groups, and because communication invariably exists in the context of one or more of these, it’s important to create messages and strategies for each. 

Direct. These companies or organizations are very similar to yours in multiple aspects of a product or service offering. They may or may not compete with all the same services, the delivery might be different, or they may have a different marketing strategy. Maybe you sell red apples and they sell green. You market the sweetness of your apples and the competitor highlights the texture of theirs. Sure, in some cases there is not a direct competitor, but this is not the only type. 

Indirect. Some companies offer a product or service that is different, but intended to solve the same problem. This might make it easy for consumers—maybe they either like apples or bananas. You’ll never be a banana, but maybe you can convince more people that potassium isn’t that important. 

Perceived. These are the most challenging types of competitors to identify, because they require your marketing team to stop focusing on your business and concentrate instead on the customer’s point of view. Monitoring is the only way to identify this group of companies. (Social media tools like Twitter are great for this and provide more insights than marketers had even a few years ago.) Apple-flavored gummy vitamins may have nothing on the real fruit, but maybe your target audience thinks they get the same vitamin C from both. 

Partner competitors. We hear a lot about strategic partnerships in the business community today, and they can be incredibly important to your communications strategy. Businesses are always changing, though, and the company that might have been your best referral source is now expanding because what you do seems like a great growth opportunity. Say hello to the grapple (looks like an apple, tastes like a grape).

PR and social media strategies are most effective when they communicate what’s different about a company, product, or service, not what’s better. That difference should be based only on a well-researched, honest, and objective look at all the competitors in your fruit basket. 

Source:prdaily.com/

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Why the PR industry is ripe for disruption

ripe-avocados

Ask any company looking to hire a public relations firm what attributes they’re seeking, and they rattle off a list of qualities they assume all PR agencies possess.

They want:

• A creative team that interacts regularly with the public and stays on top of all the latest cultural and industry trends.

• A group of hip strategists that chat on the phone for hours a day; they are everyone’s best friend and take the time to understand new phenomena.

• Most important, an agency that gets them results.

Though these are precisely the qualities a company should seek (and expect) from a PR agency. Unfortunately, the agency model has become antiquated—stifling creativity by focusing on the billable hour, maintaining old-school workplace policies, and enforcing obsolete values on employees.

This attrition is startling. Our industry has one of the highest rates of employee turnover. Nobscot Corp. estimates voluntary and involuntary turnover reached more than 55 percent over the past 12 months. Not surprisingly, when unhappy employees leave agencies, it results in unhappy clients. The average “agency of record” tenure has decreased dramatically.

According to the Bedford Group, client/agency tenure has shrunk from more than seven years to less than three years.

The PR agency model is ripe for disruption. All around us technology and the creative class are turning industry on its head, and I believe the PR agency model is about to undergo a dramatic shift—one that will better serve clients and provide greater meaning and value to employees.

Since the recent economic recession, we’ve already seen a shift in demand for smaller, more specialized agencies (which are typically more nimble and progressive). Public relations is a $13 billion industry, growing at a rate of 8 percent.

Small, midsize, and independent firms are outpacing large and multinational firms. These smaller, specialized firms report 10.4 percent revenue increases compared with that of publicly traded firms, which report revenue growth of only 6 percent. Clearly, the winds are beginning to shift, but there’s still more to be done.

Gender 

In 2010, Ragan.com revealed that 73 percent of the PR industry is female, yet an overwhelming 80 percent of upper management is male. I’m not here to bash the male gender (I happen to love them), nor get on a “Lean In” soapbox about workplace gender inequality. The point is that countless human behavioral studies prove that men and women think very differently—especially as it relates to processes and problem solving.

The PR agency world is broken today primarily because of gridlock in idea creation and thought process. When men sit at the top of the org chart driving company strategy, their leadership (despite the best of intentions) doesn’t work for the majority female workforce in the ranks below.

Professional associations such as the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) should place more emphasis on developing female executives and encouraging female entrepreneurism within our industry. In addition, we should work to diversify our workforce and attract younger male professionals to seek PR careers.

Since 2000, PRSA has awarded 11 men and just three females its prestigious Gold Anvil Award. Clearly, we have a female leadership deficit that must be addressed in order to bridge and diversify agency thought processes.

Workplace culture 

In full disclosure, I’m a millennial and I’ve been called every name in the book by Baby Boomers—from “entitled” to “fantasizer” to “hard to manage.” In my experience, it’s not that millennials are horrible agency employees, it’s just that Boomer bosses resist workplace change. This gridlock only exacerbates employee and client turnover.

By 2025, three-quarters of the global workforce will be millennials. These fresh professionals bring with them a keen desire to work in a team environment, a desire for personal fulfillment, and the need for flexibility. To prepare, traditional PR agencies must shed their hundred-page employee handbooks, processes, strict workweek regimens, and heavy management styles.

The good news? Millennials are digital natives, which means we’re typically multitaskers and seek roles in which we can balance many initiatives. This makes us perfectly suited for an agency environment.

Some agencies are already embracing this trend. For example, Allison+Partners employees receive paid time off for individual community service activities of their choosing, and Coyne PR offers a “Zen den” with massage chairs, a pool table team room, a nail salon, and a bar for happy hours.

At AR|PR, our millennial-centric culture is rooted in one simple motto: Believe the best IN each other. Want the best FOR each other. Expect the best FROM each other. 

This enables us to infuse fun and teamwork into our everyday efforts, while always focusing on client results. It also means we don’t have a dress code, and we give employees unlimited vacation. To prove this decision was wise, I calculated how much time I would have given employees in sick, vacation, and holiday PTO over a six-month period, and they actually took less time off. It’s all about creating a culture employees want to be a part of and feel fulfilled by.

Shifting media landscape 

Today’s evolving digital landscape and media shifts are forcing PR agencies to adapt. Mediaplatforms are moving far more rapidly than traditional agency pace, and I predict the agencies that don’t change will die.

I once had a boss tell me that our agency should have a policy of turning press releases around in 48 hours, and clients shouldn’t expect same-day, priority treatment. Au contraire. When CNN2 (now known as HLN) launched in 1982, the 24/7 news cycle was born. Most recently, social media (Twitter, specifically) has ushered in a light-speed news cycle that forces PR practitioners to respond at a rapid pace.

Moreover, traditional news media outlets are morphing into digital news engines, churning out more content than ever before. At the same time, this content is more concise and is created with a social-media-savvy audience in mind.

Boomer and Gen X agency leaders must recognize that their millennial colleagues embrace new media platforms in a much more authentic way. For example, when I was in college in the early 2000s, Facebook was just being rolled out to selected campuses.

The younger team members at my firm today use social media in a way that blows even my young mind. For this reason, agency leadership should co-mentor with younger team members. I encourage older generations to learn and absorb the practices of these digital natives and empower them to lead the agency in these respective functions.

The future 

I understand that many readers will balk at my assertions, and I can now kiss my dreams of winning a PRSA Gold by The weDownload Manager”” style=”width:7.5pt;height:7.5pt;visibility:visible;mso-wrap-style:square” o:button=”t”> Anvil goodbye. But after representing dozens of cutting-edge, disruptive technology companies, I was inspired to share my perspective on how our 100-year-old industry can collectively dream bigger, do better, and work harder.

The world relies on PR pros to tell the stories that should be told. With innovation all around us, we now have the tools and knowledge to tell these stories with more gusto than ever before. Let’s move our agencies into a new era, one that preserves our industry legacy and credibility yet attracts a new generation of talented storytellers.

Source:prdaily.com

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Swimsuit retailer recreates Sports Illustrated cover with plus-size models

SI-swimsuit-issue-reenactment-Swimsuits-For-All

The problem with the models in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue (besides the fact that they don’t have my number on speed dial) is that a number of people find that the models’ body types don’t represent that of the average swimsuit wearer. 

The company Swimsuits for All is living up to its name in its latest marketing campaign, showing that you don’t have to look like a Sports Illustrated supermodel to rock a two-piece. The brand is recreating some of SI’s swimsuit shots with plus-size models. 

Source:prdaily.com
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PR Firms , Brand Promotion in the World Wide Area

The nature of PR Agency is not the content marketing itself. but increasing pressure from brands to pitch mediocre or bad content. Reporters, influencers, bloggers, and media channels are already swamped with a rising tide of bad content. Add aggressive pitching from PR professionals, and this will only make the situation worse while accelerating the degradation of the relationships between brands and their media sources.

We also must be well read in practically every aspect of their brands’ or clients’ industries to maintain current and be able to counsel clients about their PR marketing. This also means that PR will need to work in concert with marketing efforts, so that inadequate resources are not wasted producing bad content that will get no traction or attention.

With an eye on a year’s general Marketing, the Business man wants to hire a Delhi-based public relations agency.

Business man, is expected to make frequent visits to the market ahead of anther thing in Delhi .

 

The chosen agency will have to ensure at least half a dozen stories each in national, regional and vernacular newspapers based on the inputs provided by client, Executive said, client is also seeking at least one story each in national magazines and television based on its inputs every month.

We do social media PR for our client and give good traffic and reputation in the market . Discussing client, LinkedIn, Facebook or myspace, Tweets, Pinterest, video clip, social material, influencer marketing, social service and of course, statistic and statistics.

TCS are aware that the healthcare industry that includes medical professionals, event managers, content developers, brand managers, competent engineers and experts in the healthcare industry ensures that our clients in healthcare receive the best media exposure. Best PR agency for this all field.

There are many PR Company in Delhi India, deal with pr prospective but Teamwork Communication Solutions Pvt Ltd is one of the best PR Firms in Delhi. It deals with affordable price and return good out put out of the market.

Source: shvoong.com

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Facebook Knows When You’re About to Update Your Relationship Status

facebook-relationship1

Facebook released new findings on Friday — Valentine’s Day — that hints when two people are about to change their status to “in a relationship.”

In the three months (or about 100 days) before a couple updates their status to make their relationship Facebook official, the social network sees a steady increase in the number of timeline posts shared between the two. In fact, posting to each other’s pages will peak (1.67 posts) at 12 days before the relationships begin and when the update is officially made (“day 0”) posts typically start to decline.

SEE ALSO: 12 Facebook Statuses You Need to Retire

Facebook only looked at couples who declared an anniversary date — and not just changed their relationship status — between April 11, 2010 and Oct. 21, 2013, and remained “single” 100 days before and “in a relationship” 100 days after that date. The findings are a part of a larger six-part series that looks at love.

FacebookChart

 

“Presumably, couples decide to spend more time together, courtship is off, and online interactions give way to more interactions in the physical world,” the company said in an official blog post.

Less interaction isn’t a bad thing, and posts shared tend to get sweeter and more positive following a relationship status update. To determine this, Facebook looked at words expressing positive emotions — such as “love”, “nice” and “happy” — compared to ones with negative connotation (“hate”, “hurt” and “bad”). Check out the graph below to note the increase.

FacebookChart2

 Twitter also revealed which countries and U.S. regions tweet about being in love the most. Users in Israel say “I love you” most, followed by those in Sweden, Norway, Spain and Hungary. In the U.S., people in New York, Michigan and Nevada say those three words most on the site, while some of the least sentimental states are Montana, Idaho, Nebraska and New Hampshire.

Source:mashable.com

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