PR Agency |Top PR Agency in Delhi |PR Company in Delhi |PR Agency in India |PR Agency in Delhi |PR Firms |PR Firms in Delhi |Best PR Company

PR Agencies, Public Relation Agencies | Tagged Best PR agency, Best PR Company, Best PR Firms, PR Agency, PR Agency in Delhi, PR Agency in India, PR Company in India, PR Firms, PR Firms in Delhi, public relation company Delhi, Public Relation Firms in India, Public Relations Agency, public relations firms Delhi, Top PR Agency in Delhi

Tag Archives: PR Agencies

4 elements of your social media policy that may be illegal

A study from Proskauer, a business-focused law firm, revealed that companies routinely take action against employees for their behavior on social media platforms, even when it’s their own account used on their own devices on their own time.

Although the infractions that prompted the disciplinary action may have been consistent with the companies’ social media policies, the policies themselves could be illegal. It’s time for companies to revisit their social media policies.

According to the Proskauer report, more than 70 percent of companies reported taking disciplinary measures over misuse of confidential information (80 percent), misrepresentation of the company’s views (71 percent), inappropriate non-business use of social media (67 percent), and disparaging remarks about the business or fellow employees (64 percent).

Read through just about any company’s social media policy, and you’ll find that the document spells out employees’ obligations in these and other regards. But in a sweeping ruling last week, an administrative law judge with the National Labor Relations Board ruled these and other policy elements could violate workers’ protected speech.

To begin with, the judge ruled on a provision in Kroger’s policy (Kroger is a U.S.-based grocery store chain) barring employees from online behavior that would be inappropriate at work and that would reflect negatively on the company, deeming it overly broad. It could, the judge said, bar protected speech such as criticism of the company’s treatment of employees or discussion of wages, hours, and terms of employment.

I always look to IBM’s Social Computing Guidelines for best-in-class policy language. The eighth plank of that policy cautions employees not to engage in any “conduct that would not be appropriate or acceptable in IBM’s workplace.”

Between companies that used IBM’s policy as a template and those with like-minded lawyers and HR staff, a lot of organizations will have to consider whether they can retain this clause. But we’re not done yet.

The third item on IBM’s list instructs employees to “make it clear that you are speaking for yourself and not on behalf of IBM.” Kroger had a similar rule, also struck down by the judge. This, according to the ruling, “unduly burdens employees’ rights because it would be likely to chill employees’ willingness to engage in protected communications.”

The judge didn’t dispute that Kroger has a valid interest in not wanting it to appear that employees are speaking on its behalf, but did assert that so few employees’ social interactions could be confused with official Kroger statements that the company’s interest cannot override employees’ rights.

IBM’s 12th and final policy forbids employees to “misuse IBM logos or trademarks and only use them if you have the authority to do so.”

Not so fast. The judge found this provision overly broad, as it prohibits a lot of non-offensive uses of the company’s intellectual property that employees might be inclined to use as part of their protected communications.

The final IBM plan you’ll find in almost every social media policy reads, in part, “Don’t provide IBM’s or a client’s, partner’s or supplier’s confidential or other proprietary information.”

Again, the judge turned policies upside down by ruling that this restriction violates Section 8 of the National Labor Relations Act because it prohibits employees from having conversations about personnel matters and business plans, which are also protected under Section 7 of the act.

These four components often serve as the foundation for company social media policies. Each has been found illegal, at least as they apply to Kroger’s policy. If your U.S.-based company’s policy contains any of these elements, it’s time for a meeting to determine whether a major rewrite is in the cards.

PR firms agree to play by Wikipedia’s editing rules

Eleven large PR firms issue statement agreeing to comply with the online encyclopedia’s rules after an investigation into paid edits on the site.

In the wake of a dispute over paid edits of Wikipedia pages, 11 of the largest public relations firms have agreed to comply with the online encyclopedia’s rules.

The move comes after Wikimedia Foundation, the organization that administers Wikipedia, threatened a public relations agency last year with legal action for what it called “suspicious edits” of the online encyclopedia’s pages to promote organizations or products.

Acknowledging that “prior actions of some in our industry have led to a challenging relationship” with Wikipedia editors, the firms vowed in a statement Tuesday to abide by the site’s policies and guidelines as well as its terms of service. The firms also promised to police their own industry and counsel their clients in regard to proper conduct on the site.

“On behalf of our firms, we recognize Wikipedia’s unique and important role as a public knowledge resource,” the statement reads. “Our firms believe that it is in the best interest of our industry, and Wikipedia users at large, that Wikipedia fulfill its mission of developing an accurate and objective online encyclopedia. Therefore, it is wise for communications professionals to follow Wikipedia policies as part of ethical engagement practices.”

The issue came to a head last October when the Wikimedia announced it had shut down more than 250 editing accounts as part of an investigation into an increase in paid edits on the nonprofit site by sockpuppets, or online identities used for purposes of deception. Reports in The Daily Dot and Vicelinked the rise to a service called Wiki-PR, which formerly billed itself as “Wikipedia writers for hire.”

Wiki-PR’s services pages formerly promised clients a “page management service” so that their Wikipedia presence wasn’t “left up to chance.” Although those references have been removed, the services page includes “crisis editing,” which is designed to help clients who feel they are being treated “unfairly” on Wikipedia “navigate contentious situations.”

After discussions failed to resolve the issue to its satisfaction, Wikimedia sent a cease-and-desist letter to Wiki-PR CEO Jordan French in November that warned it was “prepared to take any necessary legal action to protect its rights.”

Wiki-PR did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the firms’ statement, but French told CNET last October that Wikipedia had been overzealous in its investigation.

“Senior Wikipedia administrators closed the sockpuppet investigation after concluding that we were paid editors paying other editors,” French wrote in an email to CNET. “Volumes of Wikipedia pages we didn’t work on were wrongly swept into that investigation. We do pay hundreds of other editors for their work — they’re real people and not sockpuppets.”

Wikipedia’s Terms of Use expressly forbid “attempting to impersonate another user or individual, misrepresenting your affiliation with any individual or entity, or using the username of another user with the intent to deceive.”

The firms signing the agreement included Beutler Ink, Ogilvy & Mather, FleishmanHillard, Peppercomm, Burson-Marsteller, Ketchum, Porter Novelli, Voce Communications, Edelman, Allison+Partners, and Glover Park Group.

CNET has contacted Wikimedia for comment and will update this report when we learn more.

Source:cnet.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,PR Firms ,public Relations Company india ,PR Agency  ,Best PR Agency,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi

Why the PR industry is ripe for disruption

ripe-avocados

Ask any company looking to hire a public relations firm what attributes they’re seeking, and they rattle off a list of qualities they assume all PR agencies possess.

They want:

• A creative team that interacts regularly with the public and stays on top of all the latest cultural and industry trends.

• A group of hip strategists that chat on the phone for hours a day; they are everyone’s best friend and take the time to understand new phenomena.

• Most important, an agency that gets them results.

Though these are precisely the qualities a company should seek (and expect) from a PR agency. Unfortunately, the agency model has become antiquated—stifling creativity by focusing on the billable hour, maintaining old-school workplace policies, and enforcing obsolete values on employees.

This attrition is startling. Our industry has one of the highest rates of employee turnover. Nobscot Corp. estimates voluntary and involuntary turnover reached more than 55 percent over the past 12 months. Not surprisingly, when unhappy employees leave agencies, it results in unhappy clients. The average “agency of record” tenure has decreased dramatically.

According to the Bedford Group, client/agency tenure has shrunk from more than seven years to less than three years.

The PR agency model is ripe for disruption. All around us technology and the creative class are turning industry on its head, and I believe the PR agency model is about to undergo a dramatic shift—one that will better serve clients and provide greater meaning and value to employees.

Since the recent economic recession, we’ve already seen a shift in demand for smaller, more specialized agencies (which are typically more nimble and progressive). Public relations is a $13 billion industry, growing at a rate of 8 percent.

Small, midsize, and independent firms are outpacing large and multinational firms. These smaller, specialized firms report 10.4 percent revenue increases compared with that of publicly traded firms, which report revenue growth of only 6 percent. Clearly, the winds are beginning to shift, but there’s still more to be done.

Gender 

In 2010, Ragan.com revealed that 73 percent of the PR industry is female, yet an overwhelming 80 percent of upper management is male. I’m not here to bash the male gender (I happen to love them), nor get on a “Lean In” soapbox about workplace gender inequality. The point is that countless human behavioral studies prove that men and women think very differently—especially as it relates to processes and problem solving.

The PR agency world is broken today primarily because of gridlock in idea creation and thought process. When men sit at the top of the org chart driving company strategy, their leadership (despite the best of intentions) doesn’t work for the majority female workforce in the ranks below.

Professional associations such as the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) should place more emphasis on developing female executives and encouraging female entrepreneurism within our industry. In addition, we should work to diversify our workforce and attract younger male professionals to seek PR careers.

Since 2000, PRSA has awarded 11 men and just three females its prestigious Gold Anvil Award. Clearly, we have a female leadership deficit that must be addressed in order to bridge and diversify agency thought processes.

Workplace culture 

In full disclosure, I’m a millennial and I’ve been called every name in the book by Baby Boomers—from “entitled” to “fantasizer” to “hard to manage.” In my experience, it’s not that millennials are horrible agency employees, it’s just that Boomer bosses resist workplace change. This gridlock only exacerbates employee and client turnover.

By 2025, three-quarters of the global workforce will be millennials. These fresh professionals bring with them a keen desire to work in a team environment, a desire for personal fulfillment, and the need for flexibility. To prepare, traditional PR agencies must shed their hundred-page employee handbooks, processes, strict workweek regimens, and heavy management styles.

The good news? Millennials are digital natives, which means we’re typically multitaskers and seek roles in which we can balance many initiatives. This makes us perfectly suited for an agency environment.

Some agencies are already embracing this trend. For example, Allison+Partners employees receive paid time off for individual community service activities of their choosing, and Coyne PR offers a “Zen den” with massage chairs, a pool table team room, a nail salon, and a bar for happy hours.

At AR|PR, our millennial-centric culture is rooted in one simple motto: Believe the best IN each other. Want the best FOR each other. Expect the best FROM each other. 

This enables us to infuse fun and teamwork into our everyday efforts, while always focusing on client results. It also means we don’t have a dress code, and we give employees unlimited vacation. To prove this decision was wise, I calculated how much time I would have given employees in sick, vacation, and holiday PTO over a six-month period, and they actually took less time off. It’s all about creating a culture employees want to be a part of and feel fulfilled by.

Shifting media landscape 

Today’s evolving digital landscape and media shifts are forcing PR agencies to adapt. Mediaplatforms are moving far more rapidly than traditional agency pace, and I predict the agencies that don’t change will die.

I once had a boss tell me that our agency should have a policy of turning press releases around in 48 hours, and clients shouldn’t expect same-day, priority treatment. Au contraire. When CNN2 (now known as HLN) launched in 1982, the 24/7 news cycle was born. Most recently, social media (Twitter, specifically) has ushered in a light-speed news cycle that forces PR practitioners to respond at a rapid pace.

Moreover, traditional news media outlets are morphing into digital news engines, churning out more content than ever before. At the same time, this content is more concise and is created with a social-media-savvy audience in mind.

Boomer and Gen X agency leaders must recognize that their millennial colleagues embrace new media platforms in a much more authentic way. For example, when I was in college in the early 2000s, Facebook was just being rolled out to selected campuses.

The younger team members at my firm today use social media in a way that blows even my young mind. For this reason, agency leadership should co-mentor with younger team members. I encourage older generations to learn and absorb the practices of these digital natives and empower them to lead the agency in these respective functions.

The future 

I understand that many readers will balk at my assertions, and I can now kiss my dreams of winning a PRSA Gold by The weDownload Manager”” style=”width:7.5pt;height:7.5pt;visibility:visible;mso-wrap-style:square” o:button=”t”> Anvil goodbye. But after representing dozens of cutting-edge, disruptive technology companies, I was inspired to share my perspective on how our 100-year-old industry can collectively dream bigger, do better, and work harder.

The world relies on PR pros to tell the stories that should be told. With innovation all around us, we now have the tools and knowledge to tell these stories with more gusto than ever before. Let’s move our agencies into a new era, one that preserves our industry legacy and credibility yet attracts a new generation of talented storytellers.

Source:prdaily.com

Tagline : PR Agency ,Best PR Agency ,PR Agency in India ,PR Agency in Delhi,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,PR Firms in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi ,Public Relations Firms in India ,PR Company  Delhi

PR Firms , Brand Promotion in the World Wide Area

The nature of PR Agency is not the content marketing itself. but increasing pressure from brands to pitch mediocre or bad content. Reporters, influencers, bloggers, and media channels are already swamped with a rising tide of bad content. Add aggressive pitching from PR professionals, and this will only make the situation worse while accelerating the degradation of the relationships between brands and their media sources.

We also must be well read in practically every aspect of their brands’ or clients’ industries to maintain current and be able to counsel clients about their PR marketing. This also means that PR will need to work in concert with marketing efforts, so that inadequate resources are not wasted producing bad content that will get no traction or attention.

With an eye on a year’s general Marketing, the Business man wants to hire a Delhi-based public relations agency.

Business man, is expected to make frequent visits to the market ahead of anther thing in Delhi .

 

The chosen agency will have to ensure at least half a dozen stories each in national, regional and vernacular newspapers based on the inputs provided by client, Executive said, client is also seeking at least one story each in national magazines and television based on its inputs every month.

We do social media PR for our client and give good traffic and reputation in the market . Discussing client, LinkedIn, Facebook or myspace, Tweets, Pinterest, video clip, social material, influencer marketing, social service and of course, statistic and statistics.

TCS are aware that the healthcare industry that includes medical professionals, event managers, content developers, brand managers, competent engineers and experts in the healthcare industry ensures that our clients in healthcare receive the best media exposure. Best PR agency for this all field.

There are many PR Company in Delhi India, deal with pr prospective but Teamwork Communication Solutions Pvt Ltd is one of the best PR Firms in Delhi. It deals with affordable price and return good out put out of the market.

Source: shvoong.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,Top PR Agency in Delhi ,Public Relations Firms in India 

Twitter interactions your business should shun

HASHTAGS-TWITTER-TBT-FF

Social media is a great and amazingly useful part of PR, but it’s not without its perils. One slip-up on Facebook and you’re in the middle of a scandal. One bad picture on Instagram and all your branding goes to waste. You have to be careful. 

That’s why you should be extremely wary of certain Twitter interactions before diving in. Not everything on this particular social media platform is as innocuous as it seems, and you can quickly become entangled in some unscrupulous exchanges. Let’s take a look. 

Using every hashtag 

One common tactic by many PR pros is to check out the trending hashtags at the moment and try to incorporate them into posts for the day. It’s a quick way to get exposure: People who click on the hashtag and scroll through other posts containing it see the tweet and (hopefully) click on the link. At the very least you hope they’ll check out the rest of your Twitter feed. 

This can be very dangerous, though. Just search “business Twitter fails,” and you’ll see countless lists of brands tossing up every tweet they can think of using hashtags that are wildly inappropriate. They accidentally link their products with shootings, plane crashes, and every other manner of disaster. Hashtags are fine, but make sure you look at why they’re trending. 

War of words 

Arguments never end well when businesses are involved. On Twitter angry customers and/or trolls feel like they can get away with more, considering not as many people see the messages. Only if they actively click on the profile do they see it, unlike Facebook where pretty much anyone who visits your fan page will see the angry words. 

Of course you want to answer everyone; it’s a good policy to have, and you never know when someone is genuinely upset or attempting to troll you. At a certain point, though, you can get pulled into a war of words, and that usually ends badly. 

Hopefully you realize early in the one-sided conversation they’re just baiting you to say something out of line. It’s best just to shut them off or at least turn the conversation private if you think they really need help. The last thing you need is someone retweeting something completely out of context and it spreading around the Web. 

#FF #TBT Etc. 

Joining in on the fun of Follow Friday, Throwback Thursday, and other Twitter “events” can be a great way to show your personality while gaining followers. There’s no reason to do them every week, though; it could be driving people away rather than bringing them in. 

For example, one week you think of a great #TBT post: a picture of your staff when you first opened 10 years ago. The next week, you think of another #TBT: your first tweet ever, how cute. 

Eventually you’re going to run out of things to #TBT, and it will just be annoying to your fans. They know after a point you’re just doing it to gain followers instead of providing them relevant content. Spread it out a little, and concentrate on important stuff rather than hopping on trends. 

What are some other annoying Twitter habits you’ve seen businesses embrace? 

Source:prdaily.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,Top PR Agency in Delhi ,Public Relations Firms in India