PR Agency |Top PR Agency in Delhi |PR Company in Delhi |PR Agency in India |PR Agency in Delhi |PR Firms |PR Firms in Delhi |Best PR Company

PR Agencies, Public Relation Agencies | Tagged Best PR agency, Best PR Company, Best PR Firms, PR Agency, PR Agency in Delhi, PR Agency in India, PR Company in India, PR Firms, PR Firms in Delhi, public relation company Delhi, Public Relation Firms in India, Public Relations Agency, public relations firms Delhi, Top PR Agency in Delhi

Tag Archives: Best PR agency

Study: Most Facebook brand posts written at 5th grade level or below

What do you get when you analyze 5,800+ brand Facebook pages and nearly 1.6 million total posts?

Depressed, I assume.

But you also get some interesting insight into social media content. The Marketing Maven’s Guide to Facebook took this approach, and the results can be found here.

Some of the highlights from the study:

• The majority of brand Facebook posts (67.3 percent) are written at a fifth grade level or below.

• Lunchtime posts are most popular, but after hours posts (5 p.m. – 1 a.m.) see higher interactions per hour.

• Posts with photos are 37 percent more effective than posts with just text.

• Fewer than 1 in 6 posts contain hashtags, but those that do see 60 percent greater engagement on average.

• Posts with exclamation points more than double engagement.

Digiday took particular exception to the idea of most posts being written at a fifth-grade level or below, noting, “Facebook requires that users be at least 13 years old, or in seventh or eighth grade.”

Source:prdaily.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,PR Firms ,public Relations Company india ,PR Agency  ,Best PR Agency,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi

3 marketing strategy lessons from Dad

phil-modern-family-cool-dad-1

With Father’s Day coming up this weekend, I’ve been thinking about some of the advice I’ve received from my dad over the years. 

My dad’s an engineer, so my pulling marketing strategy lessons from his insight may be a bit unexpected; still, here are three nuggets of wisdom I’ve gleaned from him:

1. Not everyone will appreciate your sense of humor. My dad is great at puns and bad jokes. (Based on Father’s Day cards I see, I think a lot of dads have this “skill.”) He’s received countless eye-rolls from me, but that doesn’t stop him from telling them. He is who he is, and every once in a while he’ll still catch me off guard and get a genuine smile from me. In the same way, remember that not everyone will appreciate everything your business shares, from social media updates to media pitches. Keep your brand identity consistent, and appeal to your primary target audience.

2. Know your audience. Speaking of targets, it’s important to know your target audience. Something my brother clued me in to when I was in high school is that getting what you want from Dad takes a different approach from wheedling stuff out of Mom. This was important for me to learn, so that when I proposed something like a family vacation or study abroad, I could frame it in a way that he would respond to better. Do you know your company’s target audience and what they respond to best? It can be tricky to figure out sometimes, but it’s important. Remember to look at your Google Analytics and Facebook Insights to see what types of content your followers engage with best. Also, don’t be afraid to ask your customers questions. Ask them what they like about your business and what you can do better.

3. Repeat your message over and over again. When it comes to marketing strategy, this isn’t a shock, but it’s always worth repeating. When I think of my dad, certain phrases come to mind, like, “Sleep fast.” I’ve always hated bedtime (and still do), but he repeated himself so often that to this day, when I’ve stayed up too late I tell myself to “sleep fast.” That message definitely sank in. You want your company’s message(s) to sink in to your target audience, too. Remember to repeat yourself over and over, so that when they hear certain key phrases they think of you.

Have you learned any marketing strategy lessons from your Dad? Please share them in the comments below, and have a nice Father’s Day. Emily Sidley is senior director of publicity at Three Girls Media, Inc., a boutique public relations and social media management agency located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley. A version of this story original appeared on the company’s blog.

Source:prdaily.com

Tagline : PR Agency ,Best PR Agency ,PR Agency in India ,PR Agency in Delhi,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,PR Firms in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi ,Public Relations Firms in India ,PR Company  Delhi

7 reasons to try out new tools—without wasting time

new-tools-apps

Whenever a new online tool hits the , you’ll find somebody ready to tell you why you shouldn’t waste your time with it. 

Critics have different reasons for rejecting the latest app: It serves no legitimate business or marketing purpose, it’s not ready for prime time, the potential risks haven’t been determined yet, it’s a flash in the pan, and so on.

When Snapchat was new, it was dismissed in marketing circles. What value was there in pictures that “disappeared” in 10 seconds? Besides, there was nothing like a brand page for people to follow. Now, Snapchat is fast becoming a standard marketing platform. Suddenly, there’s a cottage industry in articles and posts extolling Snapchat’s virtues, presenting case studies and listing innovative ways to use it.

Some companies that were first to test Snapchat’s waters—such as Rebecca Minkoff and Taco Bell—have developed big follower numbers. For McDonald’s and Taco Bell, Snapchat is a battleground for brand advocacy in the breakfast wars. Gary Vaynerchuk calls it his most valuable marketing tool.

Recently, we’ve had dismissals of Whisper and Secret, though both have been the focus of interesting communication efforts. A TV series paid Whisper to add its images to the mix. When users whisper a secret using one of the specified keywords, a related image is dished up as the background. As for Secret, Vic Gundotra’s departure from Google was first reported as a Secret post.

When a new tool seems to be drawing an audience—especially your audience—there’s little reason to hold off on undertaking an experiment or two, and there’s plenty of justification for taking the plunge:

• You have a content strategy, not a separate strategy for every platform, so adapting your stories and messages to new platforms is not a drain on resources. 

• It’s no big deal if the platform doesn’t take off. There’s no huge investment to lose, and maybe it paid off for a while. You can apply what you’ve learned to other platforms. 

• By testing the waters before a platform gets big, you have a bit more leeway than usual, because mistakes there won’t get the same kind of attention that a gaffe on Facebook or Twitter would. 

• If your target audience includes early adopters, an app’s first user cohorts fill the bill. 

• If the tool becomes a hit, you’ll already have content and fans waiting when the hordes arrive. Think about Red Bull on Instagram, for instance. 

• You’ll undoubtedly reach some people you’re not reaching on other channels. 

• Your experimentation will help your in other communication efforts as you adapt to the acceleration of online change. 

To temper this enthusiasm, a note of caution is in order. 

Jelly, shrugged off as a communications vehicle by many of the initial reviews, was so quickly adopted that one commentator said he was uninstalling the app because his feed was so overloaded with marketing. Personally, I haven’t experienced this on Jelly; the number of questions shared by organizations in my feed is still in single digits. But overwhelming an app that’s still building an audience with commercial material could kill it before it has a chance. 

Short of flooding a community with branded content, experimentation should be the norm for our organizations, not something we let our competitors do first. 

Source:prdaily.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,PR Firms ,public Relations Company india ,PR Agency  ,Best PR Agency,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi

Company markets protective blanket for school shootings

bulletproof-bodyguard-blanket-protecht_school-shootings

The shooting at Reynolds High School just outside Portland, Oregon, was the 74th school shooting since the tragic death of 20 children at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in December 2012.

The prevalence of school shootings prompted one company, ProTecht, to take action. It has unveiled the Bodyguard Blanket, an orange, bulletproof pad with which children can cover themselves if an armed attacker comes into their school. (The company says the blankets can also be used to protect kids from debris from tornadoes, which is why they’re orange, making them easier for first responders to see.)

In a Tuesday post about the blankets, Jezebel characterized the company’s efforts as profiteering. Here’s what writer Madeline Davies said about them:

It’s entirely understandable that a parent would want to protect their children from tornadoes and mass violence, but there are better ways to do that than by buying a $1,000 Bodyguard Blanket. Instead, let’s increase school budgets so administrations can afford adequate natural disaster shelter for their students and ban all guns. Treat the disease, not the symptom.

Commenters on Facebook seem to have mixed opinions. One, Michael Koruniak, simply wrote, “It’s hard to imagine a society where an industry like this can flourish.”

Others said they believe the blankets are a necessary for child safety, while still others offer suggestions for making the blankets more effective. One said they should have flaps on the sides that kids could pull down.

Source:prdaily.com

Visit our site. Visit our site. PR Agency in India  ,PR Agency in Delhi  ,Top PR Agency Delhi ,Public Relations Firms Delhi  ,PR Firms in Delhi ,PR Firms Delhi ,Public relation Company delhi ,PR Firms ,public Relations Company india ,PR Agency  ,Best PR Agency,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi

Report: 1/4 of top online retailers fail at digital marketing

fail-test-grade

Internet retailers that find themselves on the list of the Top 500 Retailers likely got there through hard work and a good product, but a quarter of them can’t credit their marketing department.

A new study from Wpromote found that 124 brands among the top 500 online retailers deserve a failing grade when it comes to digital marketing. Only two percent of the companies on the list deserved an A, according to the study.

“Digital marketing has leveled the playing field,” said Mike Mothner, founder and CEO of Wpromote, in a recent statement. “You don’t need to be a retail giant to be a successful digital marketer, but a holistic view of the customer experience differentiated the winners and losers. Retailers can’t provide a seamless e-commerce experience without organic traffic, for example, and still be successful.”

The study judged these online retailers based on the following categories: paid search, SEO, social media, E-commerce, email marketing, blog and mobile.

Don’t feel too badly for the 25 percent. They certainly have failed all the way to the bank.

Source:prdaily.com

Tagline : PR Agency ,Best PR Agency ,PR Agency in India ,PR Agency in Delhi,PR Company in India,PR Company in Delhi,PR Firms in Delhi,Best PR Company ,Top PR Agency in Delhi ,Public Relations Firms in India ,PR Company  Delhi